Trump Makes Heart Wrenching Announcement About His Son Eric… He Needs Your Prayers

President-elect Donald Trump has just announced some very sad news about his son, Eric.
“My wonderful son, Eric, will no longer be allowed to raise money for children with cancer because of a possible conflict of interest with my presidency,” Trump wrote on Twitter. “Isn’t this a ridiculous shame? He loves these kids, has raise millions of dollars for them, and now must stop. Wrong answer!”
Eric Trump’s charitable foundation will be forced to stop directly soliciting contributors, following public criticism of an online auction that the Eric Trump Foundation had sponsored offering a chance to have coffee with his sister Ivanka.
Eric has been raising money for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Tennessee since he was only 21, helping raise more than $15 million for the institution, which offers free care to children in need. His associates say he feels “deep regret” over not being able to continue his efforts.
Naturally, experts have begun comparing Eric’s charitable campaigns to those of the Clinton Foundation—sadly, the only people who will suffer from this is sick children. These two organizations could not be more different. Eric is a successful businessman who doesn’t need to funnel money to useP in his personal life through the guise of a foundation.

What do you think? Is this unnecessarily punitive?

President-elect Donald Trump has just announced some very sad news about his son, Eric.
“My wonderful son, Eric, will no longer be allowed to raise money for children with cancer because of a possible conflict of interest with my presidency,” Trump wrote on Twitter. “Isn’t this a ridiculous shame? He loves these kids, has raise millions of dollars for them, and now must stop. Wrong answer!”
Eric Trump’s charitable foundation will be forced to stop directly soliciting contributors, following public criticism of an online auction that the Eric Trump Foundation had sponsored offering a chance to have coffee with his sister Ivanka.
Eric has been raising money for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Tennessee since he was only 21, helping raise more than $15 million for the institution, which offers free care to children in need. His associates say he feels “deep regret” over not being able to continue his efforts.
Naturally, experts have begun comparing Eric’s charitable campaigns to those of the Clinton Foundation—sadly, the only people who will suffer from this is sick children. These two organizations could not be more different. Eric is a successful businessman who doesn’t need to funnel money to use in his personal life through the guise of a foundation.
What do you think? Is this unnecessarily punitive?